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Exercises are Boring Trumpet Exercises
 
  Wherever possible, it’s best to try to simply use your ear to help you reproduce the sound you hear – the sounds you want to hear. But this can be frustrating especially when you’re on your own & you’re struggling to play to you’re latest CD or play a tune in your head. So only struggle for so long, then try a couple of exercises.  
Flute: Flute lessons, Newburgh, Fife Dinny kill your love of music with exercises. If they rob you of your passion for the instrument, they’ve done you no good. Try them - but stop as soon as you start to feel like a robot.
Bass Guitar: Bass lessons, Newburgh, Fife However, exercises will:

Give you a break from the brain ache of using your ear
Help you become familiar with your instrument (next time you are using your ear, you should find it easier to find your notes)
Acquaint you with all the notes available on your instrument (& highlight problems with your instrument). Especially chromatic scales
Show you the range of your instrument
Develop good finger movement around your instrument & 'finger memory'
Develop control of: embouchure, diaphragm, tongue for wind & position & movement of fingers, wrist, arm with stringed instruments / keyboards

Trumpet: Trumpet lessons, Newburgh, Fife
 

Exercises are patterns. They can be a key to becoming very proficient but they also bore thousands of youngsters into giving up.

Don’t do them relentlessly! – unless that turns you on…

 
 
Bass Guitar: Learn the bass in Newburgh, Fife

Lessons touch on exercises now and again sometimes to break up the lesson but usually when something is highlighted that needs particular attention. Long notes for a good tone & diaphragm control on wind, scales for ad-lib playing or finding the notes to a tune once you've sussed out it's key. I don't dwell on them but like students to know how to do them if they wish..

If you need to play a long note in your chosen piece, but struggle to keep it pure, you'll be introduced to the 'long note' exercises. If you have to play a quick run in a particular key, you'll be shown the exercises of this scale. You'll then see what doing these exercises does for you & you can choose whether or not you want to do more of them.
A few to start you off...  
 
 
Chromatic scales: There are 24 Scales you can do – if you include minors & majors - & they’re Oh So Boring. But there’s only one chromatic scale & it uses all the notes on your instrument. So if you’re gonna do any scales at all, do this one. It’ll also uniquely show up any problem notes on your instrument (buzzing frets on a guitar or sticking pads on a sax.)
When you get right to the bottom of your instrument & right to the top, you’ll be playing notes you won’t use very often. It’s still good to get to know them though so you find the range of your instrument & so that it’s not a stab in the dark the first time you do need to use them.
Chromatic scales start with the lowest note on your instrument & go all the way up the highest note. They use ALL the notes you have & go up in ‘semi-tones’. There are 12 notes in a chromatic scale, or 13 if you include the top 'octave' note... which is actually the same note as the 1st note – just an octave up - the first note of your next octave. But don't let that make you stop at 13...no, no, keep on goin'. Semi-tone played on the piano: Music Theory, Newburgh, Fife

Scales: The theory here is the same for every instrument, thought the keyboard is used to demonstrate.

Scales & arpeggios can help you lock into a certain key. If you are playing a piece in A major for example, you have a certain set of 7 notes of the 12 available which will be played very often, missing out the other 5. The Arpeggio gives the 3 'safest' notes within this key & which will often be used the most within these 7. Although all 12 may be used. So knowing a scale of A major by rote will automatically lean you towards playing the right notes for your piece.

 

Scales also give you valuable practice at sustained runs, & arpeggios the skill to move fast & accurately up your instrument whilst only playing 3 notes per octave. They also instil a sense of ‘chord’.

There are 8 notes in a normal scale. No 8 being the same note as no 1 so if you start on an ‘A’ when you’re playing note number 8 you’re also playing an ‘A’ – just an octave up. Start on any lowish note. (You don't have to know what the note is) Scales can be minor or major. On a piano, in a scale of C major, you would not play any of the 5 black notes in your scale. It's the same for every instrument though for some, knowing which are black or white notes is not so easy. However....

You can work out which notes you should play in a scale, first play the 13 note Chromatic scale - from any note on your instrument. You should finish on the same note as you started - but 1 Octave up (on a sax or flute this is the same fingering but in the next register ....on any brass instrument it's also the same fingering).

Next start again but only play notes:

 

1,3,5,6,8,10,12 &13...& you have your major scale. This works in any key
Notice that the black notes on the keyboard are the notes not being played:
2,4,7,9,11
For the minor scale play: 1,3,4,6,8,10,12 &13 or
1,3,4,6,8,9,11&13  
   
   
or another way of looking at it...
An Octave played on a Piano Keyboard : Music theory tuition, Newburgh, Fife
Major Scale
note
interval between
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
tone
tone
semi-tone
tone
tone
tone
semi-tone
Minor Scale
note
interval between
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
tone
semi-tone
tone
tone
tone
tone
semi-tone
LISTEN to the sound of the scale carefully. You should aim to be able to find a scale in any key by ear without always having to work it out using the method above / left. Normally though, you'll need to work it out though in a few keys before this'll happen. Find a piano & play a scale of C major (C is pictured being played above). Just play the white notes & listen to how it sounds.
 
Arpegios: These are like scales, only you play just 4 notes in an Octave. These are the Root note, the third the fifth, & finally the root again up an octave. You can keep going up as far as your instrument will allow – then back down again. ‘The bugle call ‘The Last Post’ is based on an arpeggio. This is because a Trumpet with no valves is only capable of playing arpeggios. Arpeggios are good for identifying the notes being played in a particular chord because they are indeed, the root, the third & the fifth. Some more advanced chords have something added – like the 7th but the basis of all chords are made up this way. Arpeggios can be minor or major .
 

Long Notes

Playing a single note for as long as possible – as long as your lungs can last or as long as your fiddle bow will allow gives you a good exercise in control. If you can make a note last as long as is possible on your instrument whilst keeping it pure in pitch, volume & tone, you will be ahead when a long note comes along in your piece of music. As it’s unlikely to be as long as the one you tried in your exercises, you’ll find it easier & it'll sound good & controlled.

Not too necessary on the piano! – or even the guitar.

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